Apple cider vinegar can be the basis of an effective weight loss strategy: FACT!

In order to convince any doubters out there, let me give you some of the facts about fat, the role it plays in our body, and how we go about eliminating it. If you can garner a basic understanding of these processes, it will become clear to you exactly how apple cider vinegar can work to aid the body’s natural processes and help you to lose those excess pounds. Apple cider vinegar is natural—it’s not a medicine and it’s not a drug, nor is it some miracle fat burner or diet pill that promises the earth and then leaves you wanting. What it is, is a supplement—a natural remedy that you can take every day. Even if you don’t believe all the claims, take it anyway and let the results speak for themselves.

Losing Weight with Apple Cider Vinegar
Losing Weight with Apple Cider Vinegar

How Does Fat Affect Us?

Fat plays a critical role in keeping our bodies healthy and functioning at their best. Now wait, that is not your golden ticket to run off and scarf down a box of donuts! We need only a certain amount of the right kind of fat in our diets, whether we are watching our weight or not. But granted, getting this right is nothing short of an incredibly delicate balancing act, especially when there is so much contradictory literature on the subject out there. But don’t worry folks, I am here now to lay out the no-holds-barred truth about fat and what it does and doesn’t do for our bodies, with the hopes that it will help all of you develop a healthier relationship with the dreaded leper that we all do our best to avoid!
So welcome fat back into your lives folks, but do so cautiously!

Losing Weight with Apple Cider Vinegar

What Does Fat Do For Our Bodies?

Sometimes in order to give the right answer, we first have to ask the question in the right way. To properly answer the above question, we have to answer two questions:

  1.   What purpose does storing fat in our bodies have?
  2.  What external and internal factors affect the usage of fat?

The most critical reason for our bodies to store fat is to provide us with a storehouse of fuel. This portable resource is there to see us through periods where food is scarce or temporarily unavailable. Our bodies have evolved and adapted over thousands of years to survive harsh winters and long migratory treks as hunter gatherers. They have also needed to provide us with energy on demand to hunt when we haven’t had a meal for a period. Life was pretty rough and brutal back then so our internal organs needed “shock absorbers” to allow our vital organs to survive heavy impacts from falls and blows from our prey. We thus have deep body fat around our livers, lungs, heart, and other organs.

In modern society food is readily available all year round, however our bodies are still driven by our biological imperatives. Funny how our resolve to stick to our diets and eating plans crumbles close to Christmas. The decrease in daylight as winter approaches is a trigger for our bodies to store more fat, to insulate us, and see us through the lean winter months. However, our bodies are amazing biological machines that make our modern lifestyle possible. When we eat, our bodies burn the carbohydrates for instant energy and the protein is also used as a fuel source, but it is our stored fat that that gets us through the long haul of work and exercise.

There are various internal and external factors that affect the way our bodies store and utilize fat. We also need to differentiate between the different types of ingested fats, such as saturated and unsaturated fats and what they do to and for our bodies. These categories of fats are broken down further into many sub-groups, mono-saturated and poly-unsaturated fats are some examples of these.

The major factor in where our bodies store fat is gender. Males tend to start storing fat on their tummies and then spread it evenly over the buttocks, legs, chest, arms, and back. Females tend to store fat mostly on their buttocks, hips, and chest, and then evenly over the rest of their bodies. This difference is again thanks to evolution and Mother Nature!

The interaction of the fats and the other food we ingest with our bodies is greatly affected by the health of our bodies. And in turn, the health of our bodies is greatly affected by the foods we ingest and in what quantities and ratios we ingest them. This is because of the many different types of fat in the food we eat and the fact that these different types of fat react differently with our bodies. If your digestive system is not healthy it can compromise its ability to digest and extract sufficient amounts of the nutrients we need. It is this relationship between food and health that apple cider vinegar interacts with and aids.

During the digestive process, most of the fats we eat are absorbed by our bodies and then recombined and used in the various chemical reactions taking place in our bodies. Certain fats are involved in the reaction of enzymes in the body, some aid the activity of hormones, some vitamins such as A, D, E, and K require the presence of fat in order to be absorbed. Fats also play a role in the health of our nervous system. When combined with the mineral phosphorus, they produce lecithin. Lecithin is required for the production of neurotransmitter chemicals and these chemicals help the brain regulate appetite, mood, and cognitive functions. Some of the fats the body requires cannot be reconstituted, such as Omega-3 and Omega-6. Omega-3 and Omega-6 are fatty acids that work in opposition to one another, so getting the correct ratio in your diet is essential. Omega-6 aids the active responses of the body, raises blood pressure, and aids clotting and cell regeneration. Omega-3 does the opposite and aids the “calming responses.” These fatty acids can be found in various foods such as fish, green leafy vegetables, wheat germ, and olive oil to name a few.

Generally speaking, it’s the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fats that we have to watch in our diets to maintain long-term health. Unsaturated fats are beneficial to our health, while too much saturated fats are detrimental. While both occur in a variety of foods, studies show that they do not occur in equal quantities. Unfortunately, saturated fats are far more prevalent in our normal diets than unsaturated fats. Saturated fats are found in processed foods and animal products such as dairy products, meats, pastries, and chips. Unsaturated fats are found in foods such as nuts, olives, and avocados. The chemical structure of saturated fats is saturated with hydrogen atoms and contains no double bonds between carbon atoms; they are generally not liquid at room temperature. Unsaturated fats have double bonds in their chemical structure, have less hydrogen atoms, and they are generally liquid at room temperature.

So, as you can see, the right amount of the right kind of fats is vital in order to keep our body functioning at its best. There are many ways in which apple cider vinegar helps us to make the best use of the fats we consume in order to improve health and promote weight loss, but more about this later. Let’s take a look at the ways that fat works in the body—for better or for worse.

How Does Fat Make Us Fat?

How Does Fat Make Us Fat?

Its elementary dear readers: If you consume the same or less calories that your body needs to function, you will never get fat! Now I am not going to launch into a good and bad food lecture, because we all know what we should or shouldn’t be eating. Ladies, you know you are going to regret inhaling that whole slab of chocolate as you sit and watch Friends reruns, and guys, you know that you shouldn’t be eating a double burger, fries with cheese sauce, and a liter of soda as you watch your favorite sports game.

It is pretty clear to all of us that being in good shape has a marked effect on our quality of life. Carrying extra fat increases your chances of disease and chronic health issues such as infertility, arthritis, stroke, kidney disease, diabetes, heart disease, and cancers of the prostate, breast, stomach, and colon, to name a few!

How Does the Body Process and Eliminate Fat?

How Does the Body Process and Eliminate Fat?

There are many different mechanisms at work in the body that determine how much fat the body uses. It is very difficult to lose fat or stay slim if even one of our mechanisms is not functioning properly. Our metabolism, the overall rate of activity in our bodies, is one of the most important mechanisms. It is affected by our genetic makeup, our weight, the amount of exercise we do, our body fat percentage, our body temperature, how much sleep we are getting, how well our thyroid is functioning, what we eat, our age, and our gender.

In terms of our genetic makeup it seems that some people’s bodies tend to store fat more readily than others. The theory some have put forward is that there is a “thrifty gene” in some people. This “thrifty gene” is what would have allowed some of our ancestors to survive cyclical harsher winters. They would have stored more fat than most other people, so when a particularly barren winter or other natural disaster occurred, the individuals with this gene would have stood a better chance of survival.

Our weight, or our lean body mass, is another factor that affects how much fat we burn. The more muscle mass an individual has the higher the energy requirements to “run” the body (big cars use more fuel). Thus, tall, larger framed people’s bodies require more energy to keep going day to day than small, slightly built people.

People who exercise for long periods or who have a lot of muscle mass will burn off the food they take in relatively quickly and the body then turns to its fat stores for energy. Bodybuilders eat six to eight meals a day to maintain their size and provide their bodies with enough resources. This is so they don’t burn muscle mass when their fat stores are depleted. Long-distance runners and professional cyclists need to take in food when competing. This is because their body fat percentages are already so low.

People with a high body fat percentage more than likely lead a sedentary lifestyle. Their bodies will more than likely get all their energy requirements from the food they eat and still have some leftover to store as fat. There are, however, other factors that have an effect on body fat. The “set point theory” concept is that your body has a stable quantity of fat cells by the time you are an adult. The more weight you carried in your childhood and your teenage years, the more fat cells you will have as an adult. These fat cells then become “fuller” or “thinner” as you gain and lose weight as an adult. The set point is the trigger in these cells that will send a message to your brain saying that your fat cells are getting too thin and that you must eat more. Different people’s fat cells will have different set points, and the strength of the message is affected by the number of cells. Thus a person with lots of fat cells and a high set point will battle with cravings for food when dieting.

The set point in the cells is affected by their sensitivity to insulin. The byproduct of the breakdown of most of the foods we eat is a simple sugar called glucose. As the level of glucose in your blood rises, your pancreas needs to start secreting more insulin to unlock your cells, so that they can use it for energy. If your blood sugar is constantly high from over-eating and not enough exercise, your insulin levels will also be high. This can lead to a condition known as insulin insensitivity. When this happens your cells don’t react to the insulin in your blood and therefore don’t allow the glucose into your cells to be burnt as energy along with the fat. It is very hard to lose fat with this condition. This is one of the main causes of adult diabetes.

When the insulin in our blood reaches the receptors in the fat cells, it tells them to allow glucose in. When the glucose enters the fat cells, it reacts with the fat and oxygen from our blood to give off energy that our bodies can use. Heat is a byproduct of this reaction and the faster the rate of the reaction, the more heat is given off. This is called thermogenesis. People with a high rate of reaction are therefore burning more fat than those with a low rate of reaction. The rate of thermogenesis will naturally vary from person to person, but a low rate can also be caused by insulin insensitivity. Again, dietary health and a lack of exercise play a role.

Diets high in fats and refined carbohydrates combined with a lack of exercise wreak havoc on our body’s blood sugar regulating mechanisms. These factors lead to insulin insensitivity and eventually diabetes. When a person becomes obese from over-eating, their blood glucose will be high and this leads to diabetes. Diabetes hinders the body’s ability to burn glucose and fat, which leads to obesity.

There are ways to counteract insulin insensitivity and improve thermogenesis and thereby reduce the amount of fat we carry. The pillars of this are diet and exercise. So called slow release carbohydrates, such as vegetables and fresh fruit along with legumes and whole grains, are good sources of soluble fiber and release glucose into the bloodstream more gradually than refined foods. Exercise helps reduce the glucose level in the blood by thermogenesis and the rate of thermogenesis will improve as the fat cells to be burnt as energy along with the fat. It is very hard to lose fat with this condition. This is one of the main causes of adult diabetes.

When the insulin in our blood reaches the receptors in the fat cells, it tells them to allow glucose in. When the glucose enters the fat cells, it reacts with the fat and oxygen from our blood to give off energy that our bodies can use. Heat is a byproduct of this reaction and the faster the rate of the reaction, the more heat is given off. This is called thermogenesis. People with a high rate of reaction are therefore burning more fat than those with a low rate of reaction. The rate of thermogenesis will naturally vary from person to person, but a low rate can also be caused by insulin insensitivity. Again, dietary health and a lack of exercise play a role.

Diets high in fats and refined carbohydrates combined with a lack of exercise wreak havoc on our body’s blood sugar regulating mechanisms. These factors lead to insulin insensitivity and eventually diabetes. When a person becomes obese from over-eating, their blood glucose will be high and this leads to diabetes. Diabetes hinders the body’s ability to burn glucose and fat, which leads to obesity.

There are ways to counteract insulin insensitivity and improve thermogenesis and thereby reduce the amount of fat we carry. The pillars of this are diet and exercise. So called slow release carbohydrates, such as vegetables and fresh fruit along with legumes and whole grains, are good sources of soluble fiber and release glucose into the bloodstream more gradually than refined foods. Exercise helps reduce the glucose level in the blood by thermogenesis and the rate of thermogenesis will improve as the fat cells become more sensitive to insulin. Exercise will therefore improve the effectiveness of a good diet, and the more you exercise, the better the results will be from doing it.

How much sleep we get and a regular sleeping pattern can also play a role in fat loss. The pituitary gland releases a growth hormone which is a protein-based peptide hormone. This hormone stimulates growth, cell reproduction, and regeneration in humans. These functions require energy and thus a healthy release of this hormone has a secondary benefit of burning energy while we sleep. Nearly 50 percent of the human growth hormone release occurs during the third and fourth REM sleep stages. Studies have shown that a healthy diet and a regular sleeping pattern aid the amount and consistency of human growth hormone release.

There is a reason why we crave sweets and starches when we diet. Tryptophan is an amino acid that is released into the brain when we eat. While the brain is receiving regular doses of tryptophan it determines that we are getting enough to eat. If the levels of tryptophan become low, the brain thinks starvation might be imminent and stimulates the urge (craving) to eat. We crave carbohydrates because they provide a quick energy release and a quick release of tryptophan. Constant dieting or fasting can create an imbalance in tryptophan and eventually lead to binging.

Having a good source of fiber in your diet will also help you regulate your weight. As well as improving your insulin sensitivity, fiber helps you feel fuller and reduces the number of calories your body will absorb. An example of a water-soluble fiber is pectin. Anybody who has made jam or jelly at home knows how pectin congeals when mixed with water. This has a positive effect on weight loss because the same thing happens with water and pectin in your stomach. It therefore makes you feel full for longer. Apples have a high level of pectin and can improve your chances of effective weight loss by helping to curb your appetite.

High-fat-content meals generally leave you feeling full for longer because fats are most often among the last nutrients to be absorbed in the digestion process. It is important, as I’ve said before, to eat the right kinds of fats in the correct ratios. There is also a smart time to eat your fats. If you tend to battle with cravings in the afternoon or just before bed, try having more fats with your lunch. Adding some walnuts or having an avocado with your meals will help curb those cravings and keep them under control. If you can’t climb into bed without raiding the refrigerator, try having a large salad with olive oil and apple cider vinegar dressing with your dinner.

Diets high in salt can lead to water retention, and although being overweight is primarily as a result of carrying too much fat, water retention can also leave you feeling bloated and lethargic. If you ingest too much salt or your diet lacks potassium it can lead to similar symptoms. Potassium acts in the opposite way to sodium in our bodies. Where sodium helps our cells retain water, potassium helps them eliminate it. Thus, adding substances with a high potassium content, such as apple cider vinegar, can help balance the amount of water in our cells. Lowering your salt intake along with this is still the best course of action for optimal results.

Related Topics

Do you find it difficult to eat a healthy diet because you are concerned about carbs?

The complete online comprehensive diet and weight loss program

The Green Coffee Weight Loss Program

Raspberry ketone is a natural phenolic compound that is the primary aroma compound of red raspberries…